Clean Air and Water

Ensuring clean air and water, healthy subsistence resources

Alaska is home to the largest remaining pristine ecosystems in the United States. Trustees for Alaska works to ensure it stays that way. Without vigilance, Alaska’s iconic and pristine character could become one of toxic dust, dirty water, and devastated fish and wildlife populations. Alaskans rely on clean water and air and toxic-free environments. Not only are two of Alaska’s major economic drivers—fishing and tourism—reliant on that unspoiled quality, but everyday Alaskans who provide for their families working in those industries or by hunting, fishing, and gathering also rely on clean air and water. Large-scale industrial mining projects threaten Alaska’s clean air and water. Once in place, these mines emit toxic dust into our air, draw clean water out of our streams, and discharge dirty water laden with chemicals onto the tundra, and into our rivers and oceans. Under current state statutes and regulations, there is hardly any oversight to minimize the environmental impacts of mineral exploration. Public notice and the ability for citizens to weigh in on decisions directly affecting them are limited or nonexistent. The scale tips toward mining companies—often from foreign countries—and away from Alaskans. Trustees for Alaska works to bring the scale back into balance so that we aren’t compromising our clean air, clean water, and healthy subsistence resources.
Our latest Clean Air & Water program work includes:
  • Protecting pristine salmon habitat and the world’s largest wild sockeye fishery from the proposed Pebble mine. 
  • Fighting legislation that would make it easier for projects to pollute our air and water and cut Alaskans out of the decision-making process.
  • Ensuring that the public has a say before the State of Alaska allows industries to pollute our water.
  • Protecting the clean water, fish, and wildlife resources of the Cook Inlet watershed.
Scroll and click on the stories below to learn more about what Trustees for Alaska is doing to keep Alaska’s environment clean and healthy.
Pebble called “worthless”

Pebble called “worthless”

A New York based investment firm gave Bristol Bay a Valentine this week. Kerrisdale Capital, a research-oriented firm, described the Pebble project…
What’s at stake in new political climate

What’s at stake in new political climate

A political tsunami will wash over the country on inauguration day. We don’t yet know what the damage will be, but we…
The Pebble Mine is not dead

The Pebble Mine is not dead

  Pebble is not dead. The Canadian conglomerate that wants to mine in Bristol Bay continues to pay lobbyists. It continues to tout the…
2016 Triumphs, Challenges: The Year in Review

2016 Triumphs, Challenges: The Year in Review

Celebrating the successes of 2016: Pebble subpoenas tossed out; Trustees argue for National Park Service regulatory authority over navigable waters; court decision stops Mat-Su coal mining; and more.
Court Rejects Pebble’s Second Attempt to Subpoena Mine Opponents

Court Rejects Pebble’s Second Attempt to Subpoena Mine Opponents

A Federal judge has tossed out Pebble Limited Partnership’s (Pebble) subpoena issued to Dr. Carol Ann Woody. The subpoena is part of…
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