Wild Lands and Wildlife

Watching over public lands and the wildlife dependent on them

Eighty percent of Alaska consists of publicly owned state and federal lands. Alaska parks, forests, refuges, and other public lands are vast areas of spectacular beauty. They teem with healthy populations of wildlife, from whales to wolves, caribou to bears, and salmon to birds. Many of these species are unique to the far north or have been endangered or eliminated from areas in the rest of the country. Some are endangered even within Alaska’s vast expanses of natural habitat. Under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (“ANILCA”), the most significant land conservation measure in our history, Alaska gained substantial protections for our lands of national importance. However, many are regulated for multiple-use, including resource development. Other protected lands are under intense and constant pressure to be made available for resource development. Demands for increased motorized access, new road construction, oil and gas exploration, large-scale industrial mining, and other inappropriate development threaten these lands and the wildlife dependent on them. What happens on these lands has impacts far beyond their borders. And laws and regulations are not always enforced. It is imperative that we keep a watchful eye on the state and federal land and wildlife management agencies.
Our latest Wild Lands and Wildlife program work includes:
  • Defending the Secretary of Interior’s decision to protect the internationally-recognized habitat and Wilderness of the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Supporting the National Park Service’s efforts to prevent the State of Alaska from allowing predator control activities, like bear baiting, in National Preserves.
Scroll and click through the stories below to learn more about what Trustees for Alaska is doing to protect Alaska’s state and national public lands.
Alaska Brief Newsletter — April 2017

Alaska Brief Newsletter — April 2017

Dear Supporter: We have good reason to celebrate this month. The company that wanted to put a coal strip mine through 14 miles…
There’s a bear behind you!

There’s a bear behind you!

  Running into a bear can turn into the story of a lifetime. Running into a bear 30 times over can turn…
Predator control in Alaska

Predator control in Alaska

  “You can’t let nature run wild: predator control in Alaska” by Peter Van Tuyn was first published on the American College…
What did we learn from the Exxon Valdez?

What did we learn from the Exxon Valdez?

The Exxon Valdez oil tanker struck Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound on March 24, 1989, spilling over 11 million gallons of…
Why do I do this work?

Why do I do this work?

Katie Strong, staff attorney Growing up on the shores of Lake Superior gave me a deep appreciation of wild places and the…
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